9 responses

  1. Richard G. Kopf
    March 17, 2017

    David,

    Your writing makes me jealous. All the best.

    RGK

    Reply

    • David Meyer Lindenberg
      March 18, 2017

      And my conclusions make you gag! Right? Right?!

      All the best,
      Dave

      Reply

  2. Thomas H
    March 17, 2017

    I look forward to reading Maggie’s reply to you saying she’s “wrong”.

    Reply

    • David Meyer Lindenberg
      March 17, 2017

      Hahaha, me too! But she knows I love her. She’s my go-to source when I write, say, a Backpage article.

      Reply

  3. Keith
    March 17, 2017

    There are two immediate implications to this.
    First, Maggie’s wrong to say “sex without consent is rape.“ (In fact, it’s only rape if the lack of consent is clearly communicated.)
    Second, there’s absolutely no basis for her claim that “consent obtained under false pretenses is not consent.“

    There’s a 1975 case here in NY your mean-ass editor may be familiar with called People v. Evans.

    The Judge ends with this:
    “So bachelors, and other men on the make, fear not. It is still not illegal to feed a girl a line, to continue the attempt, not to take no for a final answer, at least not the first time…”

    Apparently the desire for scumbags to use lines to bed women is still going strong. Who would have thought.

    Great post, David.

    Reply

    • David Meyer Lindenberg
      March 18, 2017

      A certain someone sent me that decision yesterday. What can I say? Even back then, what Judge Greenfield said (so wittily!) caused a huge outcry. And yet, he was right.

      Thanks, Keith.

      Reply

  4. Rich Rostrom
    March 17, 2017

    I can think of one way “false pretense” could be involved in rape. The perpetrator makes an explicit or implicit threat of harm to the target if the target does not consent, but cannot in fact carry out the threat – it’s a bluff.

    Note that I write “cannot”, in the sense that it is physically impossible for the perpetrator. The perpetrator may be psychologically incapable of carrying out the threat to shoot the target’s dog, but it’s still in his power and the threat is effectively real.

    However, if he claims that he will have the target fired from a job by his friend who owns the company (whom he never even met), or murdered by his accomplices in a notorious street gang (which he read about in the news), then clearly his threat is a false pretense.

    It would still go as extortion.

    Reply

    • David Meyer Lindenberg
      March 18, 2017

      Yes, and if a guy threatened to hit a girl with a papaya unless she slept with him, that’d be a way to involve papayas in rape.

      Reply

  5. Richard Kopf
    March 18, 2017

    David,

    No, you are not right about my reaction to your conclusions. However, I do hate it when you use “gag” rather than “puke.” It seems so, how shall I say it, French.

    All the best.

    RGK

    Reply

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