5 responses

  1. stevie g
    December 15, 2016

    “Ultimately, Kopf varied from the guidelines and gave Peterson the maximum, a nine-year sentence followed by five years of post-release supervision.”

    Wow, and here I was thinking this judge might be a pushover.

    Reply

  2. stevie g
    December 15, 2016

    For what it’s worth judge, my dad was a federal probation officer before he passed. He counted Jimmy Hoffa amongst his “clients.” I couldn’t say that he followed the strict letter of the law since he eschewed the federal bureaucracy. But he helped many an ex-con find meaningful employment. He realized the legal realism that doing right is not always the same as following the law.

    I remember him transporting parolees with me in the car when I was just a kid. These guys had been isolated from society for many moons. Some were shaking with anxiety and I often wondered what in the world could have happened to them, and what would happen to them in the future. They were very respectful and certainly did not pose a threat, or my father would have never allowed it. Somehow, I think my father was trying to teach me a lesson. That I later became an attorney was one of his proudest moments.

    There are so many things today that just don’t make sense, and I sometimes long for the days when people could cut through all the nonsense and just be human and do the right thing. By the way, dad was a WWII pilot and bonifide war hero. Having bullets come up from the ground and pierce his plane gave him courage we just don’t see much anymore.

    All the best.

    Reply

    • RICHARD KOPF
      December 19, 2016

      stevie g,

      I wish I had known your father. Your comment that “legal realism” sometimes means “that doing right is not always the same as following the law” is a keeper. I intend to shamelessly appropriate it at the right time.

      All the best.

      RGK

      Reply

  3. defendergirl
    December 19, 2016

    I was just speaking with one of the new federal probation hires in my district last week. He explained that state probation officers often supervise 400 people at a time and officers who do “call-in” supervision have 750!

    I am old enough to remember when we closed the asylums and that money was supposed to go to community mental health. We know how that turned out.

    The reduction in prison population will save money, but I’m willing to bet probation won’t see much, if any, of those funds.

    Reply

    • RICHARD KOPF
      December 19, 2016

      defendergirl,

      Your comparison to closing the asylums is remarkably evocative. Regarding money, I hope you are wrong, but I bet you are right.

      All the best.

      RGK

      Reply

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